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Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for justice: for they shall be filled. Mine eye also shall see my desire on mine enemies, and mine ears shall hear my desire of the wicked that rise up against me. The glory of the Lord shall endure for ever: the Lord shall rejoice in his works. He looketh on the earth, and it trembleth: he toucheth the hills, and they smoke. I will sing unto the Lord as long as I live: I will sing praise to my God while I have my being. My meditation of him shall be sweet: I will be glad in the Lord. Let sinners be consumed out of the earth, and let the wicked be no more. Bless thou the Lord, O my soul. Praise ye the Lord.

Author Topic: Intelligent Design  (Read 387 times)

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AGelbert

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This Sandgrouse Just Took the Royal Society to Design School
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2023, 10:54:19 pm »

This Sandgrouse Just Took the Royal Society to Design School


Discovery Science 198K subscribers

1,392 views  May 3, 2023  ID The Future Podcast

Today’s ID the Future takes a look at how scientists from MIT and Johns Hopkins University are picking up clever engineering tricks by studying the feather design of the Namaqua sandgrouse. Ordinary bird feathers are already a master class in ingenious design, but as Jochen Mueller and Lorna Gibson show in a recent Royal Society Interface paper, the males of this desert-dwelling sandgrouse from southwestern Africa “have specially adapted feathers on their bellies that hold water, even during flight, allowing the birds to transport water back to the chicks at the nest.” Episode guest Brian Miller details the ingenious design of these feathers and tells how they are inspiring human inventions, one of which could help desert communities collect water[Read More ›](https://idthefuture.com/1744/)
« Last Edit: May 11, 2023, 10:57:16 pm by AGelbert »
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The Pentadactyl 🐋 Whale Flipper: An Engineering ☝🏻 Masterstroke


Discovery Science 202K subscribers  Jul 12, 2023  ID The Future Podcast

Does the five-digit design of the whale flipper, curiously akin to the five-digit design of so many different kinds of animal limbs, point to evolutionary common descent? That was Charles Darwin’s argument, and the argument is a 😈 staple of high school and college biology textbooks . But no, says distinguished British engineer Stuart Burgess on today’s ID the Future in his conversation with host Eric Anderson. The repeated recurrence of the pentadactyl form is better explained by reference to the idea of common design. That is, a ☝🏻 master designer reused the pentadactyl design theme because it achieves an optimal trade-off between strength on the one hand (no pun intended) and suppleness or dexterity on the other. And yes, Burgess says, the giant flipper on a whale needs to be not just incredibly strong but also supple to allow the whale to maneuver adroitly through the water. This reuse of a good design concept shouldn’t surprise us, Burgess says. Just as human engineers reuse the concepts of the wheel, axle, nut and bolt, or pulley, so too the designer of life reuses shrewd engineering solutions in widely different applications, in each case adapting the design concept for the particular use.

Burgess also rebuts the claim that whales have vestigial pelvic bones from a land-dwelling ancestor.

He then moves from the big to the small, pointing to more positive evidence 👨‍🔬🔬 in favor of common  ☝🏻 design (over Darwinian common descent) in marsupial and placental rats and in a protein machine best known for one job but that has been found to “moonlight” doing a very different job in a very different biological context.

Tune in to hear Burgess unpack the full argument. The conversation took place at the 2023 Conference on Engineering in Living Systems (CELS) in Denton, Texas.

AGelbert NOTE: For those with hearing and/or patience problems (i.e. 🦍 Evolution Propaganda Caused low attention span...😉), these VERY SHORT videos will dispell any 🤷‍♂️ doubts you may have about whether or not ALL the claims made by evolutionists about "whale evolution" are 👉.


Is Homology Evidence for Evolution?

Whale Evolution: Good Evidence for Darwin?

« Last Edit: July 12, 2023, 05:27:37 pm by AGelbert »
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July 26, 2023, 1:08 PM by David Klinghoffer 

On ID, Myth Persists that Wikipedia Is 👨‍🔬 Reliable, though Co-Founder Has Called It “Appallingly Biased

SNIPPETS:

A thoughtful reader discovered Sanger’s candid comment after he (the reader) sought to edit the entry on ID. He says he corrected the absurdly biased opening sentence, only to find his edits almost instantly reversed, “within one minute.” The first sentence of the entry reads:
Quote
Intelligent design (ID) is a religious argument for the existence of God, presented by its proponents as “an evidence-based scientific theory about life’s origins”,[1][2] though it has been found to be pseudoscience.[3][4][5]

Why It Matters

This matters for an obvious reason: countless people curious about ID receive their introduction to the subject via a Web search that starts, thanks to Google, with a visit to the Wikipedia article. Many will stop right there. Many science reporters and others in the media — heck, many professional scientists 🤦‍♂️ — seem to have informed themselves on the topic by going no further than Wikipedia. ... ...

A Wizard Pulls the Plug on Dr. Bechly

Indeed. We’ve already recounted how distinguished paleo-entomologist Günter Bechly, after coming out for intelligent design, found his entry deleted. This was following a surreal online editorial discussion led by an editor going by the pseudonym Jo-Jo Eumerus. Jo-Jo is a self-described 23-year-old “boy” from Switzerland with a dual online identity as a 500-year-old wizard. Under this other identity, the wizard Septimus Heap, Jo-Jo explains of himself that, having been “diagnosed with Asperger syndrome,” he “sometimes [has] problems with society due to this.” Certainly he had a problem with Günter Bechly. The editors claimed the move to delete the entry was the result of their sudden realization that Bechly isn’t “notable” enough for Wikipedia. The notability argument is a joke, and even Darwinists conceded that Bechly was deleted for his support of ID.

It was Jo-Jo who made the final decision to permanently pull the plug on Dr. Bechly’s entry. The disparity in expertise — wizard versus paleo-entomologist — is blindingly obvious. Bechly changed his views on evolution and ID while serving as a curator at the State Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, Germany, where he amassed an extremely impressive scholarly record studying the evolution of dragonflies over tens of millions of years. As Jo-Jo says of his own daily activities, “Nowadays, I mostly spend my time with World Building projects and seeing a bit forward with life.”

For more on Bechly’s turn to ID, see here:


Read more:
https://evolutionnews.org/2023/07/on-id-myth-persists-that-wikipedia-is-reliable-though-co-founder-has-called-it-appallingly-biased/

Learn more:
https://intelligentdesign.org/
« Last Edit: August 02, 2023, 06:03:53 pm by AGelbert »
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AGelbert

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August 21, 2023, 6:54 AM by David Coppedge 

Elephantfish

Noise Cancellation: A Remarkable ☝🏻 Design Solution in Biology

SNIPPET:

Snakes should be immune to their own poison. Electric eels should not shock themselves. And protection from self-generated noise requires a preplanned noise cancellation system.

In a Dispatch in Current Biology, Leonard Maier discussed a biological requirement many don’t think much about: how to ignore your own noise. Eliminating self-generated noise, he says, is accomplished by “Active Sensing.”
Quote
Animals use active sensing to investigate their environment. The active sense inputs must be discriminated from those arising independently from environmental signals. An experimental and modelling study has revealed how precise control of dendritic spike backpropagation contributes to such discrimination. [Emphasis added.]
... ...
Noise-Cancelling Fish

To find that biology uses noise cancellation is both surprising and logical. An organism’s sensors must be able to differentiate between self and non-self. Muller et al. made their discovery about signal backpropagation by experimenting on mormyrid fish. These are weakly ⚡ electric fish that can generate currents as well as passively receive them. The “elephantfish” is an example of a mormyrid.

Neuroscientists have found mormyrids useful for studying biological signal processing, because the fish sends out ⚡ electric pulses that need to be attenuated by the brain, and receives ⚡ signals from conspecifics and from prey. Maier explains why a noise cancellation system had to exist. Sadly, he gives credit to evolution 🤦‍♂️ for a system that acts with “surgical precision” — 

Full article:
https://evolutionnews.org/2023/08/noise-cancellation-a-remarkable-design-solution-in-biology/
So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12

AGelbert

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Amazing Animals, Obvious ☝🏻 Design
« Reply #34 on: September 02, 2023, 07:03:26 pm »
Amazing Animals, Obvious ☝🏻 Design | Creation.Live Podcast: Episode 6


Institute for Creation Research (ICR) 28.8K subscribers Sep 23, 2022  Creation.Live

From the pets in our backyard to the creatures that dwell deep within the ocean, the world is home to a fascinating variety of animals. Where did they come from? Why do they seem so perfectly designed to fill their roles?

Join us as Dr. Jobe Martin 🕊️ shares his personal story about the evolution of a creationist and how particularly unique creatures challenged his beliefs about the world. Hosts Trey and Ivana learn about a number of intriguing animals from Dr. Martin and ICR zoologist Dr. Frank Sherwin 🕊️ in this episode of Creation.Live.

#Animals #Bible #Zoology #CreationDotLive #Podcast #Creationism #Science #Evolution #CL #ICR #Biology

Related resource: God's Living Treasures: Amazing Animals of Alaska Vol. 1 | Get the DVD here: https://store.icr.org/gods-living-treasures-amazing-animals-of-alaska.html

God's Living Treasures: Amazing Animals of Alaska Vol. 2 | Get the DVD here: https://store.icr.org/copy-of-gods-li...

God's Living Treasures: Amazing Animals of Alaska Vol. 3 | Get the DVD here: https://store.icr.org/gods-living-tre...

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AGelbert

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(Long Story Short, Ep. 10)

The Information Codes Inside Your Body


1,938 views  Sep 12, 2023
Inside your body a massive amount of encoded information that makes your life possible. Your body also contains sophisticated computer-like hardware that reads this coded information and builds the things you need for a living system. Explore the mystery of the amazing information codes inside you in this first installment of the "Codes of Life" mini-series produced as part of the "Long Story Short" show on YouTube.

Watch all of the episodes of "Long Story Short" through its 🧐 playlist:
 
 • Long Story Short 

============================
The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/
http://www.evolutionnews.org/
http://www.intelligentdesign.org/
« Last Edit: September 12, 2023, 04:59:39 pm by AGelbert »
So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12

AGelbert

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✨ God of 🌳🌺🐦🦋🦁🐠🐳❄️🌻🌿🌾🌞 Wonders (2008)


Christian  Movies 955K Dec 19, 2020
The natural universe reveals God's power, majesty, wisdom, and creative genius. The human conscience reveals God's justice and man's need for redemption. Finally, Jesus Christ is the ultimate revelation of God's love for us.

Stars: John Whitcomb 🕊️, Dan Sheedy 🕊️, Don B. DeYoung 🕊️
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AGelbert

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Sorry, 🙊🙉🙈 Evolutionists: Bees DESTROY Your Entire Worldview


Answers in Genesis Canada 44.7K subscribers Sep 29, 2023

Join Calvin Smith as he delves into the intricate world of bees, showcasing their astonishing design and intelligence. Witness first-hand how these incredible creatures defy the simplistic explanations of evolution. Explore the compelling evidence that points towards a masterful Designer behind the complexity and beauty of bees.

Subscribe to us for more high-quality biblical videos every week.

Love our content? Help us to continue to proclaim the gospel and the authority of the Bible—from the very first verse—without compromise using apologetics by partnering with us here: https://answersingenesis.ca/donate
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So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12

AGelbert

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Berlinski: Why Humans Are Unique in the World of Matter
« Reply #38 on: October 08, 2023, 11:55:30 pm »
Berlinski: Why Humans Are Unique in the World of Matter



Discovery Science 208K Oct 2, 2023 ID The Future Podcast
Eminent paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould has argued that humans differ only in degree, not kind, from other organisms, and to think otherwise betrays an ancient and outdated prejudice. But does this match up with what science has revealed in the last century? On this ID The Future, we are pleased to share the first half of an engaging conversation between Dr. David Berlinski and host Eric Metaxas on the subject of Berlinski's recent book Human Nature. Some argue that humans are growing more peaceful, enlightened, and improved by the year, and that a coming technological singularity may well usher in utopia. Berlinski isn't buying it. "There is no society without its underlying ideology," he writes in Human Nature. A universal civilization requires a universal theory, and the prevailing grand narrative preferred by most materialist scientists today is fueled largely by Darwin's theory of evolution. But is the world of matter the only world that matters? In this conversation and in his book, Berlinski argues that human beings have a fundamental essence that is radically different from the essence of other organisms and that cannot be changed at will. It's a view that is supported by the latest evidence about life and the universe in biology, chemistry, physics, and even cosmology. And it represents a fatal flaw in the Darwinian story. This is Part 1 of a 2-part conversation. This interview originally aired as a Socrates in the City event in 2022. We are grateful to Eric Metaxas for permission to share it. Watch the conversation in video form on YouTube.

Berlinski: Men Are Not About to Become Like Gods


Discovery Science 208K Oct 4, 2023  ID The Future Podcast
Are humans progressing morally as well as materially? What does it mean to be human in the cosmos? On this ID The Future, we bring you the second half of a stimulating conversation between Dr. David Berlinski and host Eric Metaxas on the subject of Berlinski's recent book Human Nature. In Human Nature, Berlinski argues that the utopian view that humans are progressing toward evolutionary and technological perfection is wishful thinking. Men are not about to become like gods. "I'm a strong believer in original sin," quips Berlinski in his discussion with Metaxas. In other words, he believes not only that humans are fundamentally distinct from the rest of the biological world, but also that humans are prone to ignorance and depravity as well as wisdom and nobility. During the second half of their discussion, Berlinski and Metaxas compare and contrast the ideas of thinkers like psychologist Steven Pinker, author Christopher Hitchens, and physicist Steven Weinberg. The pair also spar gracefully over the implications of human uniqueness. Berlinski, though candid and self-critical, is unwilling to be pigeonholed. Metaxas, drawing his own conclusions about the role of mind in the universe, challenges Berlinski into moments of clarity with his usual charm. The result is an honest, probing, and wide-ranging conversation about the nature of science and the human condition. This is Part 2 of a two-part interview.

49 Episodes of ID The Future Podcasts
« Last Edit: October 09, 2023, 12:02:27 am by AGelbert »
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November 10, 2023, 6:44 AM by Günter Bechly

Fossil Friday: How the Caterpillar Got Its Legs, or Not


SNIPPET:

This Fossil Friday features a caterpillar trapped in 45-million-year-old tree resin of Eocene Baltic amber. A caterpillar of course looks very much different from the butterfly into which it eventually develops. The wonderful metamorphosis of caterpillars into butterflies was first discovered by the British physician William Harvey (1651) and Dutch biologist Jan Swammerdam (1669), and famously featured in paintings by the pioneer entomologist Maria Sybilla Merian in her book Metamorphosis insectorum Surinamensium (Merian 1705).

The more primitive groups of insects like roaches, locusts, cicadas, and bugs have a so-called hemimetabolous development, where the nymph is similar in body plan to the adult insect, and with each molting grows in size and especially in length of the wing sheaths. However, most insect species, and indeed most animals on our planet, belong to Holometabola, the clade of insects with complete metamorphosis, which includes lace wings, beetles, bees and wasps, mosquitoes and flies, scorpionflies and fleas, as well as caddisflies and butterflies. In these insects the larva has a very different body plan from the adult insect. After the final larval stage there is a resting stage called pupa or chrysalis, in which the larval body is mostly dissolved into a kind of cell soup and rearranged into the adult body plan. This miraculous development was featured in the Illustra Media documentary Metamorphosis (Illustra Media 2011, Klinghoffer 2011) and poses a considerable conundrum for evolutionary biologists.

The Nature of the Conundrum

Only three hypotheses for the evolution of metamorphosis in insects have been presented: one, which suggests that the holometabolan larva is equivalent to the hemimetabolan nymph, fell out of favor decades ago. Another hypothesis suggested that the holometabolan caterpillar originated from a weird hybridization event of an insect with a velvet worm (Williamson 2009), which is generally considered as preposterous nonsense (Giribet 2009; also see Evolution News 2011). The currently preferred hypothesis is based on very old ideas of Harvey (1651) and Berlese (1913), which were further developed and elaborated by Truman & Riddiford (1999, 2002, 2019, 2022). Their so-called pronymph hypothesis suggests that the juvenile stages of hemimetabolous and holometabolous insects are not homologous, but that only the hemimetabolan pronymph is equivalent to the caterpillar larva, and the multiple nymphal instars are all equivalent to the pupal stage (also see Grimaldi & Engel 2005). However this hypothesis faces two formidable challenges:

1. The proymph is a non-feeding final embryonic stage, lacking functional mouth parts, which hatches from the egg and immediately molts into the first nymphal instar. The caterpillar larva is a pure feeding stage, basically a gut with legs. How could one evolve into the other with functional and advantageous intermediate forms?

2. Likewise, how could a single pupal stage, in which the complete body plan is dissolved and rearranged (including even the brain, see Truman et al. 2023 and Saplakoglu 2023), evolve via viable transitional forms from a normal series of nymphal instars that gradually transform into the adult with each molting? This appears to be not just unlikely but inconceivable and virtually impossible. Therefore, this hypothesis is controversial even among mainstream biologists, who have raised many objections to the interpretation of the pupa as only nymphal stage (e.g., DuPorte 1958). All that evolutionists have to offer are vague speculations such as this: “Perhaps 280 million years ago, through a chance mutation, some pro-nymphs failed to absorb all the yolk in their eggs, leaving a precious resource unused. In response to this unfavorable situation, some pro-nymphs gained a new talent: the ability to actively feed” (Jabr 2012). Easy peasy.

Anyway, we should expect that such a marvellous mode of development evolved from normal nymphal stages, if at all, after hundreds of millions of years of gradual change. However, that is not at all what the fossil record shows.

Full article: 👨‍🔬🔬
https://evolutionnews.org/2023/11/fossil-friday-how-the-caterpillar-got-its-legs-or-not/
« Last Edit: November 16, 2023, 01:01:43 am by AGelbert »
So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12

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Ten Biomechanical Animal Joints Enable Extreme Performance
« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2024, 04:51:14 pm »

Paper Digest: Ten Biomechanical Animal Joints Enable Extreme Performance

December 19, 2023, 6:33 AM By 👨‍🔬 Emily Reeves, a biochemist, metabolic nutritionist, and aspiring systems biologist. Her doctoral studies were completed at Texas A&M University in Biochemistry and Biophysics. Emily is currently an active clinician for metabolic nutrition and nutritional genomics at Nutriplexity.

Photo: A sling-jaw wrasse, by Alain Feulvarch, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons.

In 2021, engineer and ID proponent, Stuart Burgess analyzed ten linkage mechanisms in animal joints and published his review of their mechanical functions in Bioinspiration & Biomimetics. He chose animal joints such as fish jaws, knee joints, and bird wings due to their extraordinary performance and the extensive knowledge base regarding how they function. As a veteran mechanical engineer, Burgess is well positioned to assess the mechanics of animal joints. Notice how in the excerpt below, he praises the optimality of animal joint design and notes the potential for bio-inspiration from studying animal joints:
Quote
Ten different linkage mechanisms are presented. They are chosen because they cover a wide range of functionality and because they have potential for bioinspired design. Linkage mechanisms enable animal joints to perform highly sophisticated and optimised motions. A key function of animal linkage mechanisms is the optimisation of actuator location and mechanical advantage. This is crucially important for animals where space is highly constrained. Many of the design features used by engineers in linkage mechanisms are seen in nature, such as short coupler links, extended bars, elastic energy storage and latch mechanisms. However, animal joints contain some features rarely seen in engineering such as integrated cam and linkage mechanisms, nonplanar four-bar mechanisms, resonant hinges and highly redundant actuators. The extreme performance of animal joints together with the unusual design features makes them an important area of investigation for bioinspired designs.

As Seen at Home Depot 🤠

You may have noticed a four-bar mechanical linkage mechanism if you watched a scissor lift while shopping at Home Depot. That four-bar linkage mechanism allows the lift to extend in order to reach products on high shelves. Collapsing the scissor lift reduces the amount of space the lift takes up. Four bar linkage mechanisms have four bars and four pivot points. The length of the bars may vary as well as how the bars move in relation to each other. By using unique four-bar linkage arrangements, an engineer can optimize mechanical movements. Key points about why engineers use such mechanisms include:

Four-bar linkage mechanisms can increase force by utilizing bars of different lengths.
They can improve rotation or optimize the direction of compaction.
They move actuators away from the joint providing a mechanical advantage and lowering the energy needed for motion.

In Burgess’s paper, the first four-bar linkage mechanism discussed is the mammalian knee — a joint that has been criticized as poorly designed. As an engineer Burgess is familiar with constraints and design trade-offs. So he first discusses what the mammalian knee requirements are. To summarize, he says the knee must provide a 120o range of motion, be load bearing, and prevent overextension. He explains how through a clever design — an inverted four-bar mechanism — all of these requirements can be accomplished. The four-bar mechanism enables a large extension range, but also has an end stop which locks the knee. This lock decreases the amount of work required by the muscles to stand erect effectively making standing up easier. Because there is a broad area of contact between the femur and tibia, loads can be transferred through the joint and bore. In the knee’s four-bar mechanism, the center of rotation moves, which also provides advantages. When you squat, the center of rotation of the knee joint shifts, which reduces your muscular effort by 35 percent when you rise from the squat position. If you thought squatting was difficult, imagine how difficult it would be without this brilliant design! Burgess points out that one noteworthy constraint for joints of biological systems is that they are restricted from using a shaft inside a hole due to the necessity of a growth and development process. This relevant constraint applies to engineers working to develop self-replicating machines.

The Bird Wing Joint

The second four-bar linkage mechanism discussed is the bird wing joint. Have you ever wondered how birds can fly so long without tiring? Burgess points out that this is due in part to the brilliant engineering in the avian elbow joint, which enables wing tucking and extension. Burgess notes that, according to research done with seagulls, the elbow wing joint decreases 12.3 percent of a bird’s need for force during flapping.

Grasshoppers, dragonflies, and other insects generate lift by flapping and rotating their wings at steep angles. Flapping occurs at a frequency of 20 to 1,000 flapping cycles per second. It’s no surprise that these organisms make such a whirring sound! To accomplish such rapid movement, some incredible hinges are obviously required. Burgess points out that many insect wings have a small bar as part of their four-bar wing mechanism which ends up magnifying the wing rotation. This means that even minor movements on the insect’s body can cause a considerable angle of movement in the wing. Of course, the insect’s body must be correctly built to allow such mobility. Burgess also points out that flapping happens at a resonant frequency, which significantly reduces the inertial energy required to flap. This is only feasible because of the insect’s body architecture.

Another category of four-bar linkage mechanisms Burgess discusses is that of fish jaws. The first example he provides is a sling-jaw wrasse. As it happens, my husband and I owned a wrasse. Why? For the purpose of eliminating flatworms, vermetid snails, and bristle worms from our 75-gallon salt water aquarium. One can’t help but appreciate how incredibly well designed the wrasse’s mouth is. The term “sling-jaw” refers to the fact that these fish can hurl their jaws. Burgess notes that one function of the design is to capture prey with a quick suction approach. The second is that the sling-jaw design minimizes the amount of swimming the fish has to do. Pushing the jaw forward requires significantly less energy than swimming forward when food is nearby. As I was able to observe, the mouth of our wrasse extended so quickly and far that it made the fish an exceptionally agile hunter. Within a month or so of adding the wrasse to our tank, no pests remained — all thanks to the excellent design of the sling-jaw wrasse.

Burgess also describes the four-bar linkage mechanism of the mantis shrimp — a marine creature that punches to eat. The force is produced by a four-bar linkage mechanism connected to a biological battery. When the shrimp is ready to punch, it relaxes a muscle, the latch is released, and the accumulated elastic energy delivers 1000 N of force. That is several orders of magnitude larger than the weight of the organism.

A Gift for Engineers

To conclude, the amazing design structures in organisms provide engineers with inspiring templates for creating better products. Burgess provides three specific examples where direct study could pay impressive dividends:

Improved 3D modeling of avian wing joints has important implications for aircraft wing design.

Jaw mechanisms may result in new and improved designs for robotic clamping.
The punching mechanism of the mantis shrimp could inspire new technology in the field of industrial design.

Burgess’s review has been downloaded over 8,000 times and cited 19 times. The high number of downloads and citations suggests that there is a growing interest among researchers in using nature’s design templates to solve technological challenges. This indicates that biomimetics is becoming an increasingly important field for innovation and advancement in various industries. By studying the intricacies of natural mechanisms like four-bar linkages, scientists can gain valuable knowledge that to enhance human engineering practices. This interdisciplinary approach encourages critical thinking and innovation, ultimately benefiting various industries by inspiring more efficient and sustainable designs.
https://evolutionnews.org/2023/12/paper-digest-ten-biomechanical-animal-joints-enable-extreme-performance/
« Last Edit: January 03, 2024, 04:59:21 pm by AGelbert »
So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12